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Miss Chen
07月04日
Miss Chen
Creeping bellflower is a delicate, hardy, disease-resistant perennial that grows readily in a variety of conditions. Even though there are numerous bellflower species, the creeping variety is relatively easy to identify. The leaves found at the base of the plant are heart-shaped and become narrower and more lance-like as they move upwards. The drooping, bell-shaped purple flowers appear during the summer, growing up one side of the stem. You may think that a beautiful, easy-to-grow plant would make for a perfect garden bloom, but you'd be wrong—in fact, creeping bellflower is considered extremely invasive. If you introduce this aggressive species to your garden, you must do so carefully and strategically—otherwise, it won't be long before it chokes out your other flowers and proves almost impossible to eradicate. It has a fast-spreading and deep root system of long tubers that can become many gardeners' nemesis if left untamed. Now that the extent of its aggressive nature has been discovered, it's classed as an invasive species across much of the country. Brought to North America from its native Europe, creeping bellflower was initially a popular plant thanks to its ability to attract pollinators like bees and butterflies. Creeping bellflower produces an abundance of seeds in the summer (upwards of 15,000 per plant), which are then easily distributed by insects and gentle breezes. The plant will grow rapidly and can take over your landscape in as little as a season if left to its own devices. Ultimately, though it is beautiful, it's not recommended that you plant creeping bellflower in your garden or landscape. Botanical Name Campanula rapunculoides Common Name Creeping bellflower, rampion bellflower Plant Type Herbaceous perennial Mature Size 2–4 ft. tall, 1–3 ft. wide Sun Exposure Full sun, partial shade Soil Type Moist but well-drained Soil pH Neutral to acidic Bloom Time July to September Flower Color Lavender, purple Hardiness Zones 3–9 (USDA) Native Area Europe Creeping Bellflower Care Creeping bellflower grows pretty much anywhere. It can thrive in various light conditions and handles a variety of different soil types easily—even those that have poor drainage or are infertile. It's found in most parts of North America, other than the hottest southeastern states. That being said, moist and shady locations are where the plant tends to be at its most invasive.
Light Creeping bellflower will be most pervasive (and reseeds itself most aggressively) when growing in full sunlight. However, the plant can sustain just fine in partial shade and full shade locations as well. Soil While it can tolerate a variety of soil conditions, creeping bellflower will grow most prolifically in a soil blend that is moist but well-draining. Additionally, it can adapt to a wide range of neutral to acidic pH levels. Water Creeping bellflower plants prefer consistent water, and do best with about 1 inch of water per week, either from rainfall or manual watering methods. Once established, they are mildly drought-tolerant, though a lack of water will impact their blooming. Temperature and Humidity Though creeping bellflower is well-adapted to a variety of temperature and humidity environments, it spreads and grows most rapidly in the cooler weather of early spring or late fall. Additionally, the plants are cold-hardy down to about 5 degrees Fahrenheit, though they will cease to bloom at extremely cold temperatures. Fertilizer Creeping bellflower spreads readily and aggressively on its own, and should not be given fertilizer. How to Remove Creeping Bellflower Be prepared for a long project when attempting to eradicate the tenacious creeping bellflower from your landscape. Rigorous hand pulling, mowing, and deadheading won't eradicate the species, but it'll prevent reseeding and can help control spread somewhat. It can take several years of hard work to eliminate this species, and some horticulturists choose to focus on managing it instead. Removing The Roots Part of the problem with removing creeping bellflower is that its white, fleshy underground rhizomes and deep taproots can't simply be pulled out. Doing so carelessly will inevitably leave pieces still in the soil, and even the smallest rhizomatous section can result in regrowth. For the best success, digging out the roots is required. You'll need to dig at least 6 to 9 inches into the soil on all sides of the plant. Slowly and methodically sift out any root sections you find, and all parts of the plant should be put into sealed general waste bags. If added to compost heaps or bins, they could grow back once the compost is applied. Creeping bellflower roots can also become entangled with the roots of other nearby plants. You may have to sacrifice other species while you're working to rid your garden of this weed. If you have a prized plant you want to try saving, it's best to remove it and carefully try to separate it from the roots of the bellflower. The roots should then be washed off, and the plant should be kept in a pot to make sure that no creeping bellflower growth reappears. Smothering Methods Another method for removing creeping bellflower is to cover the plants to deprive them of light. However, this is only practical if the flowers are growing in small patches. To do so, you can use newspapers, cardboard, or plastic, which is then covered over with soil or heavy mulch. Though it may seem easier, this method isn't always foolproof—sometimes, creeping bellflower's roots will lie in a dormant state (tricking you into thinking it's been eradicated) and new growth could appear the following season.
Chemical Removal Chemically removing your creeping bellflower is best kept as a last resort. Not only can herbicides pose a risk to the environment, humans, and animals alike, but they don't always have the best success rate. However, if you find the plant has invaded your patio. driveway cracks, or paved areas in your garden, it could be worth adopting this method as it won't be possible to dig up the roots. Likewise, if the plants have spread to your lawn, you could apply a herbicide containing the active ingredient triclopyr as this won't damage the grass. Widely available broadleaf herbicides and defoliants such as 2,4-D have been proven ineffective at dealing with creeping bellflower. Limited success has been shown, however, with those that contain the active ingredient glyphosate, likeRoundup. Applying the treatment directly with a sponge can prevent it from coming into contact with other nearby broadleaf species. Best success, however, will occur if it's sprayed generously on the plant. Treatments should be applied in late spring or early fall, while temperatures are between 60 degrees Fahrenheit and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. You also want to ensure there isn't any rain in the forecast for at least a couple of days after the treatment, too. Weekly reapplications for several weeks are often recommended.
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Miss Chen
07月04日
Miss Chen
The crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) is a species of small, beautiful tree native to Asia that has naturalized in the Deep South of the United States. So often used in landscaping is Lagerstroemia indica that as you travel around some areas of the country, that you will see its presence in almost every yard. Though certainly not unique, its common use is a testament to its stunning blossoms, peeling bark, and attractive fall foliage that gives the crepe myrtle unrivaled all-season interest. Common Name Crepe Myrtle Botanical Name Lagerstroemia indica Family Name Lythraceae Plant Type Deciduous tree / large shrub Mature Size 6-25 ft. tall, 6-20 ft. wide Sun Exposure Full sun Soil Type Average, medium moisture, well-drained Soil pH 6.0-6.5 Bloom Time July-September Flower Color Red-rose Hardiness Zones USDA 6-9 Native Area China, Indochina, Himalayas, Japan Crepe Myrtle Care This species of Lagerstroemia is generally a lower maintenance selection. Though low maintenance, there are some things you can do to help get the best blooms from your crepe myrtle and ensure that your tree thrives. As always, it all starts with planning and selecting the right location. Crepe myrtles tolerate pollution, so they can handle being closer to a street, but their smaller size does not allow the species to act as a street tree. Decide in advance if you want your plant to be a shrub or a tree in form and plan for that growth. The rest of the care is all about site conditions and some basic maintenance. Knowing where to plant your tree and how to take care of it will ensure you get the most beauty for your buck. Tip Crepe myrtle, though often listed as a shrub, is not really a shrub or low-growing tree. Be prepared for it to grow up to 25-30 ft. tall. Sometimes owners of crepe myrtles who want them to stay shrub-sized will cut the main central branch (i.e., top it),which permanently ruins their growth structure and can make them extremely unsightly and sickly in the long run. Topping crepe myrtles is such a common mistake it has been dubbed "crepe murder." So, if you are certain you don't want a tree and only want a shrub, it might be best to pick a different plant!
Light To get the most prolific blooms with the best color from your tree, pay attention to the amount of sunlight. Crepe myrtle needs full sun to thrive. You should place it in a spot in your landscape that gets at least six hours of sun a day. Anything less and you will notice a big fall off on blossoms. Soil Crepe myrtle is not too demanding regarding soil pH, but it prefers neutral or slightly acidic soil over alkaline soil. However, it does get finicky with its soil moisture. The soil must be well-draining; a crepe myrtle cannot tolerate standing water, because it is susceptible to root rot. You will also want to avoid very rich soil since this produces more foliage than the desired flowers. Water Unlike most trees, the crepe myrtle needs water often, especially if the soil is not moist. To bolster those beautiful blooms, you need to water the roots deeply, particularly during dry periods. As usual, you will need to water it as it is being established, but if you live in an area that does not get a good amount of rain, it is a great idea to continue watering your crepe myrtle using the same method as you would with a newly planted tree. Water your crepe with two to three gallons of water per inch of trunk diameter. It is important to only water the roots of crepe myrtle, especially if your tree does not have enough space around it for airflow; you want to avoid watering the foliage. Wetting the foliage during watering invites powdery mildew. Temperature and Humidity Though the USDA zone map says 6-9, growing crepe myrtles north of zone 7 can be tricky. Roots that are well-protected underground or mulched will be hardy enough to survive colder winters, but exposed branches will not make it through winters that reach less than -5° Fahrenheit. To combat this, consider pruning all branches to the soil level. Crepe myrtles bloom on new wood, so new blooms will come out yearly as the tree emerges in the spring. Fertilizer You will want only to fertilize your crepe myrtle very lightly or avoid it completely. Supplemental fertilizers tend to increase foliage growth which in turn inhibits bloom production. If you need to use a fertilizer, choose a slow-release fertilizer with high nitrogen content. The content can be found by reading the NPK formulation. Before fertilizing, the best thing to do is to run a simple soil test to see if your soil is really deficient or if there is another issue. Types of Lagerstroemia Indica Lagerstroemia indica is just one plant of a genus containing 50 or so species. Straight species of L. indica are not sold in the nursery trade so you will always be buying a cultivar or hybrid, but unfortunately, they are not often marked well and the tag will just say "Crepe Myrtle, Lagerstroemia indica." If you purchase from a reputable nursery this won't be the case and you have the chance to choose from some outstanding cultivars with amazing traits that vary from form, color, and size. Some common cultivars you may see are: Lagerstroemia Indica ' Enduring Summer White' – A dwarf variety with white blooms, 4-5’ tall and wide. Lagerstroemia Indica ''Tuskarora' - Bright watermelon pink blossoms followed by orange fall color. Lagerstroemia Indica 'Catawba' - Purple blooming variety, with great fall color and a rounded habit reaching 10-15' tall and wide. Lagerstroemia Indica 'Muskogee' – 22-25’ tall and wide, lavender-blue flowers and light gray bark. Pruning Pruning your crepe myrtle is a chore that needs to be done for a few reasons. Pruning can aid in bloom production and help beautify the plant by exposing the exfoliating bark, increasing seasonal interest, and establishing the best size and form by removing suckers and errant branches. Crepe myrtles bloom on new wood, so pruning in the winter or early spring will promote prolific blooming. If you are trying to establish your plant as a tree form, it is important to prune all but one trunk off to establish a leader. Creating a tree form, in turn, will create the chore of tidying suckers and structural pruning until a single leader is developed. A single trunk creates the stunning visual of the peeling bark that makes the Lagerstroemia indica shine even in the winter. Common Pest and Plant Diseases Luckily crepe myrtles don't deal with too many pest issues, but they are susceptible to powdery mildew, sooty mold, and other fungal infections. The best way to deal with these issues is, of course, prevention. To prevent these issues from arising, water the roots rather than the foliage and allow your tree to have plenty of space to air dry after rainstorms. Yearly treatment with a general fungicide can also reduce the risk of an infected plant.
FAQ Are all crepe myrtles shrubs? No. It depends on the cultivar and how you wish to prune and train your plant. Can crepe myrtles be used as hedges? Yes, crepe myrtles make excellent hedges, though they do require regular pruning. Do Crepe myrtles only come in pink? Some cultivars give white, lavender, red, purple, burgundy, pale blue, purple, and mauve and different sizes and forms. If you choose a different species of Lagerstroemia, you can even find evergreen crepe myrtles.
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Miss Chen
07月04日
Miss Chen
IN THIS ARTICLE Care Types Pruning Propagating Growing From Seed Potting Overwintering Pests & Diseases Bloom Common Problems Frequently Asked Questions Creeping mazus (Mazus reptans) is a fast-spreading, semi-evergreen perennial that works well as a ground cover in USDA zones 5 to 8. In warmer climates, the dense, lush foliage remains green throughout the year, and it features clusters of beautiful little purple-blue flowers that blossom in late spring and summer. The tiny thumbnail-sized flowers form a dense mat and can be mowed in much the same way as turf grass. Creeping mazus is usually planted from potted nursery starts or from root divisions in the spring. It is a fast-growing plant that will quickly fill in to create a uniform ground cover. Common Name Creeping mazus Botanical Name Mazus reptans or Mazus miquelii Family Mazaceae Plant Type Herbaceous perennial Mature Size 2–3 in. tall, 6–12 in. wide Sun Exposure Full, partial Soil Type Moist, well drained Soil pH Acidic to alkaline (5.5–8.0) Bloom Time Summer Flower Color White to blue-violet Hardiness Zones 5–8 (USDA) Native Area Central Asia (Himalayas) Creeping Mazus Care Creeping mazus prefers relatively moist fertile soil in a full-sun location, but it is an adaptable plant that tolerates almost any soil type and will grow adequately in partial shade. In shady conditions, it will grow more slowly with fewer flowers. Light Creeping mazus sees rapid growth in full sun or partial shade positions. In very hot regions, a location that is shaded during the peak of the afternoon is best. Soil Creeping mazus prefers fertile, moist, loamy soil, but it is a robust species that tolerates a variety of soil types. If the soil is too hard-packed, the delicate rooting system will struggle to become established. It grows equally well in acidic, neutral, and alkaline soils. With soils that are too dry, adding mulch will help with moisture retention. Water This plant prefers to remain moist but not constantly wet. Make sure it isn't exposed to over-watering, as standing water will cause root rot. Weekly watering, especially in hot and dry conditions will ensure your creeping mazus continues to flourish. If it stays dry too long, the foliage will begin to wilt and die. Temperature and Humidity Creeping mazus copes well across a wide range of temperatures and is reliably hardy in USDA zones 5 to 8. It prefers a warm and moist environment, and in warmer climates it is evergreen. In colder zones, the foliage may turn red and go dormant in the winter months. Hard frost may kill individual plants, though a colony usually fills in again when mild spring weather returns. Fertilizer You won't have to worry about feeding creeping mazus if it's planted in a rich and fertile soil. An annual light feeding of a slow-release variety in the spring, however, could promote better growth for plants that are in dry, poor-quality soil. Types of Creeping Mazus Mazus reptans has no widely available named cultivars—the species type is the one normally sold in the horticulture trade. However, there is a related species, Mazus miquelli, that is also sometimes known by the common name creeping mazus. However, M. miquelli, a native to Japan and China, is considered an invasive plant in the Northeast U.S., and it is rarely, if ever, deliberately used as a landscape plant. Pruning Although pruning is not required, creeping mazus responds well to shearing with a mower when used as a replacement for turf grass in ground-cover situations. Propagating Creeping Mazus Creeping mazus spreads naturally as its roaming stems root themselves in soil. It is an easy matter to dig up some of these offshoots and transplant them. Here's how: In spring after an established plant is actively growing, use a sharp knife or trowel to separate an offshoot stem that has rooted itself and lift it free of the mother plant. Immediately plant the offshoot in a new garden location and water it well. If planting with the intent of creating a new ground cover, space the plants 8 to 12 inches apart, as they will quickly spread to fill the space. How to Grow Creeping Mazus From Seed Creeping mazus spreads so quickly that it's generally planted via nursery seedling flats, with plants spaced 8 to 12 inches apart and then allowed to fill in to create a carpet of greenery. However, if you are covering large areas with creeping mazus, it is possible to plant from bulk seeds sown over the area, much the way lawn seed is sown. However, if you're seeding an area previously covered with grass, make sure to remove as much grass as possible, including the roots. This will give creeping mazus the best chance of thriving, as it can't outcompete the tenacious roots of turfgrasses. Allow a decent amount of space between sown seeds, too. Remember, this plant has a fast-spreading, close-to-the-surface, sprawling root system. You don't want the area to become overcrowded, as this can impact growth. Potting and Repotting Creeping Mazus Although it's not a common way to grow creeping mazus, this plant can be grown in containers filled with standard potting mix. The low-growing trailing habit can make it a good "spiller" plant for the edges of a mixed container garden. A container of any type will do, provided it is well draining. Overwintering This plant generally requires no special winter preparation, though gardeners in colder zones may find that a layer of leaf mulch over the plants will prevent winter kill. Any covering should be raked off the plants as soon as the weather warms in the spring. Common Pests and Plant Diseases Creeping mazus is not a victim of any common serious pests or diseases, but it can be subject to damage from slugs and snails. These pests are best handled by removing them by hand, or with snail/slug baits placed in the garden. How to Get Creeping Mazus to Bloom It's rare for creeping mazus to withhold blooms during its normal flowering period, late spring though mid-summer. If it does not bloom adequately, it may be because it is not getting enough sunlight or water—both of which are necessary for profuse blooming. If both these cultural needs are adequate, then feeding the plant with balanced fertilizer may give the plants a needed nutritional boost. An old, overgrown patch of creeping mazus may stop blooming because the plants become too crowded. In this case, rejuvenate the colony by digging up the plants, dividing the roots, and replanting the pieces 8 to 12 inches apart. The colony usually responds quickly with vigorous growth and ample flowering. Common Problems With Creeping Mazus There are very few cultural problems with creeping mazus if it's grown in its established hardiness range, but occasionally you may notice brown patches appearing in the otherwise uniform carpet of green. In the colder end of the hardiness range, this can be a symptom of winter kill caused by hard frost. Unless the frost is very hard and prolonged, winter kill usually corrects itself in the spring as surrounding plants fill in to replace dead patches. Brown patches can also be caused by soil that is too dry. Creeping mazus plants like plenty of moisture, and may die back if allowed to become too dry during hot months. FAQ How is this plant best used in the landscape? Creeping mazus is a popular aground cover alternative in locations that are too moist for turfgrass to grow well—such as the banks along streams or water gardens. It also works well to fill in gaps in between flagstones or walls, and it is a favored addition in rock gardens, where it helps reduce weed growth. This species also looks lovely dangling over the edges of hanging baskets or containers. Is there a similar plant that works well in colder zones? Scotch moss can be a good alternative to creeping mazus for zones 3 and 4. It is a good plant for moist areas, and it accepts a fair amount of foot traffic without incurring permanent damage. How do I replace a turf grass lawn with creeping mazus? Creeping mazus cannot simply be overseeded in a turf grass lawn, as turf grasses are considerably more aggressive and will win the rooting battle. If you do want to replace an area of turf grass, you must first kill off or remove all the grass. Turf grass can be removed with a sharp, flat shovel, but a more effective method is to kill it off with glyphosate herbicide before replanting with creeping mazus.
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Miss Chen
07月04日
Miss Chen
The common name "creeping thyme" can refer to one of several woody-stemmed perennial species of the Thymus genus that are good groundcovers for sunny areas. While not all types are grown as herbs, they are in the mint family and have a pleasant scent; most can be used for cooking. It is closely related to the well-known edible herb. Most thyme plants are perennial in moderate climates. While some thyme species are upright and shrub-like, creeping types are low-growing with a vine-like habit. They are principally grown for the fine texture of their pointed blue-green leaves as they spread out to softly blanket the ground, but they also produce flowers of various colors, depending on the type. On mature plants, flowers usually appear in late spring and early summer. Plant creeping thyme from seeds or potted nursery starts in the spring. In its first year, it's a slow-to-moderate grower, but once it's established, it will spread quicker in subsequent years.
Common Name Creeping thyme Botanical Name Thymus spp. Family Lamiaceae Plant Type Herbaceous, perennial Mature Size 2-6 in. tall, 6-18 in. wide Sun Exposure Full Soil Type Well-drained, sandy Soil pH Neutral, alkaline Bloom Time Summer Flower Color Pink, white, purple Hardiness Zones 2–9 (USDA) Native Area Europe Creeping Thyme Care Creeping thyme plants grow best in well-draining soil with a neutral to slightly alkaline pH. Like most herb plants, creeping thyme seems to thrive in poor soils. They will grow best in full sun, although they will tolerate some shade. Creeping thyme plants can become woody over time. If woody stems take over, you may want to remove and replace the plants or strongly prune back the plants to rejuvenate growth. Creeping thyme is a hardy plant that doesn't have many problems, although it can be susceptible to root rot in wet, soggy soil. Light Creeping thyme is native to the Mediterranean regions of southern Europe, and is therefore a sun-loving plant that needs full sun (at least six hours daily) to thrive. Soil An essential element to soil success with thyme is drainage. It doesn't like wet feet, so make sure the soil drains well. It loves loose, sandy, rocky soil, and even loam if it drains well. It does not do well in wet clay. Water One issue with using fast-draining soils is that it is easy for the plant to dry out if you're not paying attention. Do not let creeping thyme get parched, especially when it's a young plant. For the most part, thyme planted in the ground or maintained at a steady, non-sweltering temperature should only need watering every 10 days; however, potted thyme outdoors in blazing hot temperatures will need watering once daily. You want the roots to be moist, but they should not be sitting in standing water. Temperature and Humidity There are creeping thyme species appropriate for zones 2 to 9, though each species has its own recommended hardiness range. As a general rule, thyme plants don't like humidity. If you live in a humid area and your plant is losing leaves, or if the foliage is looking rough, trim off the affected stems and improve air circulation. Also, add sand or gravel around the plant's base to prevent contact with moist soil. Affected plants should revive when the weather turns cooler and drier. Fertilizer Creeping thyme growing in well-prepared soil shouldn't need to be fed. If the soil is poor, you can compensate by providing a delayed-release fertilizer once at the beginning of each growing season. For the amount to use, follow the product label instructions. Types of Creeping Thyme English thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is the best-known thyme variety—it's also called common thyme or garden thyme, and is typically grown as a culinary herb. However, several types of creeping thyme are low to the ground and spread efficiently. Spicy orange creeping thyme (Thymus 'Spicy Orange') has pink flowers and grows 2 to 4 inches tall; it is hardy in zones 5 to 9. White creeping thyme (Thymus paocos 'Albiflorus') has white flowers and grows 1 to 2 inches tall and 12 to 18 inches wide. It is hardy in zones 2 to 9. Red creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum 'Coccineus') has pink flowers. It grows 3 inches tall and 12 to 18 inches wide and is hardy in zones 4 to 9. Wooly (or woolly) thyme (Thymus pseudolanuginosus) has pale pink flowers. It grows 3 inches tall and 3 to 12 inches wide, and is hardy in zones 5 to 8. Pruning Repeated pruning is the most burdensome garden task if you want to grow creeping thyme successfully. Prune back creeping thyme stems in the early spring to prepare the plant for the growing season ahead. Prune again after the flowers die back, usually by the end of summer. In late fall, after the first frost, prune the leggiest, woodiest stems by half. This pruning encourages vigorous, young growth in the spring. Propagating Creeping Thyme Thyme is a prolific grower; it self-seeds and likes to spread. Dividing thyme and taking stem cuttings gives your older plant a new lease on life, encouraging new growth. You can propagate creeping thyme via three methods: division, stem cuttings, and seeds. The best time to divide or take cuttings is in the late spring or early summer. By Division To propagate via division, you will need a sterilized sharp knife or spade. If you are planting into a new container, make sure the pot is clean and has well-draining soil. Use a pot with at least 3 inches of growing room on all sides and below the plant. Water the plant well before you divide it. Remove the root ball from the container, or if you are removing the plant from the ground, dig around the plant in a circle, about 3 to 4 inches from the center of the plant. To divide, cut through the middle of the plant, keeping the roots intact as much as possible. You can make multiple cuts as long as your plant has healthy roots. If you have old soil around your plant's roots, you can tap or shake it off. Put soil at the bottom of the pot and center the plant in the middle. The plant should have the same soil line as before. Add soil around all sides of the root ball. The packed soil should keep the plant upright. Add water until you see water run out the bottom. The soil should not appear soggy. Place it in a sunny location. By Stem Cuttings To propagate via stem cutting, you will need a healthy, non-flowering stem with new leaf growth on it, sterilized scissors or pruners, rooting hormone, fresh well-draining potting mix, and a clean pot. Cut the stem anywhere, giving you a piece that is 4 to 6 inches long. Remove the bottom 2 inches of leaves. Apply rooting hormone to the cut end of the stem, then plant the stem cutting in the center of a small container filled with fresh potting mix. Place the plant in a sunny spot. Water it and keep the soil consistently moist but not soggy. When new growth is apparent, the plant can be transplanted into the garden, if you wish. How to Grow Creeping Thyme From Seed You can start thyme from seed indoors in a small growing tray before the final frost, using a quality seed starting mix. Plant seeds on the surface of the mix with a bare covering of additional mix. (These seeds need light to germinate.) Keep the water evenly moist in a warm, bright spot about 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. To moisten the top of the soil, use a spray bottle. The seeds should germinate within 14 to 21 days. Once the seedlings have 3 to 4 inches of growth, you can transplant them into a new container or plant them in the ground once the threat of frost has passed. Potting and Repotting Creeping Thyme If you are transplanting thyme, give them room to spread by planting just one specimen per pot. If you have containers that are several feet long (such as window boxes), you can plant them about 1 foot apart. The best containers are porous—such as clay or terracotta—but any container will do as long as it has ample drainage holes. Once the plant grows too big for the container, remove the root ball and divide it. You can replant the smaller division back into the container it was in, giving it fresh potting mix. The remaining division can go into a similar container with fresh potting mix or into the garden, making way for fresh growth. Overwintering In zones where winters are cold, thyme is semi-evergreen, which means it will remain mostly green and keep its leaves, but may die back some and some branches may die. The best way to protect plants in colder USDA zones is by giving them a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch after the cold weather has set in. Apply it on a day that has hit a freezing temperature. It will keep the soil at a consistent temperature and give the plant a better chance of surviving a rollercoaster of warming and cooling temperatures that can harm a plant. Common Pests & Plant Diseases In hot, dry summer conditions, spider mites can be a problem with creeping thyme plants. Insecitidal soap is an effective treatment for these pests. On indoor plants, both spider mites and aphids are possible, again treatable with insecticidal soap. Creeping thyme is susceptible to root rot in wet, dense soils. Affected plants will need to be removed.1 How to Get Creeping Thyme to Bloom Flowering creeping thyme is very attractive to bees, and pollen from blooming thyme often flavors the resulting honey. The tiny leaves are aromatic, as are the flowers, which have a balsamic or citrus scent similar to the leaves. Depending on the variety, flowers can be white, pink, or purple. You do not have to deadhead thyme flowers. And, unlike other flowering herbs, if this plant develops flowers, its leaves will not lose their flavor. The flowers are edible too. It blooms in spring or summer for about three to four weeks. Most thyme plants do not flower in their first growing season. If your plant is established and not flowering, you can try a diluted, half-strength liquid fertilizer. Thyme doesn't usually need enriched soil, but it may be the boost the plant needs to encourage flower production. To keep your thyme blooming year after year, pruning your oldest, woodiest stems at the end of the growing season will encourage new growth and flowers in the spring. Common Problems With Creeping Thyme Creeping thyme has relatively few care needs. It's resilient against diseases and pests and is only susceptible to a few issues. Woody Stems As thyme ages and grows late in the season, it may start to get spindly and leggy. Pruning woody herbs at the end of the season is the best way to encourage new growth in the coming season. It simply requires some attention at the end of the fall season after the first frost or in early spring. Wait to prune after the plant's first growing season. Cutting is better than pulling out dead, woody stems since you run the risk of pulling out healthy new growth. Drooping Stems With Yellowing, Browning Leaves A thyme plant that gets too much water has poorly draining soil, not enough drainage holes, or is exposed to too much humidity can get yellowing or browning leaves. Decrease your watering schedule and check to see that your soil is fast-draining and there are ample holes for the water drain. Fix these parameters, and your plant may rebound if caught before the plant develops full-blown root rot, a common disease when the soil is too soggy for the roots. If you pull your plant out of the pot and notice black, rotting roots, use sterilized scissors or pruners to snip away the dead roots. Replant the healthy roots in a clean pot with fresh, well-draining soil. Also, excess nitrogen in the soil can cause a thyme plant to grow leggy, wilt, or get yellowing leaves. Steer clear of fertilizers that have a high nitrogen content. Plant Dries Out Thyme lives about four or five years at most, so if your plant starts to turn brown and looks like it's drying out and dying, it may be reaching the end of its life. Other causes can be severe frost, a lack of sun, or a fungal disease like root rot. If a harsh winter left stems looking dead, cut them back in the early spring, and the plant may rebound on its own. This sun-loving plant needs at least 6 hours of direct sun to be happy; make sure it's situated appropriately.
FAQ How is this plant used in the landscape? Creeping thyme is best used as a groundcover for small areas or to fill in spaces between stepping stones in sunny areas. It can be used to fill in crevices in retaining walls, and can also be grown in containers. How long can creeping thyme live? If you're growing creeping thyme in a pot, the original plant usually has a life span of about three to five years. However, it's a prolific plant and self-seeder. After a few years, it may look woody and spindly, so you could decide to cut back its woody stems. Commonly, you'll find baby sprouts underneath. Can creeping thyme grow indoors? Creeping thyme can grow indoors as long as you have a very bright window that gets at least six hours of direct sun streaming in; either that or a grow light should do. What plants are similar to creeping thyme? Sedum requieni, also known as miniature stonecrop, is a small-leaved, low-growing filler or groundcover that often gets confused for thyme. You can immediately tell the difference between the two by breaking off a piece and smelling the leaves; stonecrop is not fragrant.
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Miss Chen
07月04日
Miss Chen
Creeping Wire Vine (Muehlenbeckia axillaris) is a sprawling prostrate subshrub with distinctive small, round, ornamental dark green leaves and wiry stems. It requires little maintenance and is fast-spreading. It's also sometimes referred to as Matted Lignum. This plant is an excellent choice as a hardy, alternative ground cover, coping well with a medium amount of foot traffic. It also works for use on slopes to help prevent soil erosion. Because of its draping qualities, Creeping Wire Vine also looks great in hanging baskets and containers, alongside other taller plants. Because it's so vigorous, care should be taken about where it's positioned. Although it looks good on border edges, climbing on walls, and in rock gardens, it can sprawl into other plants territory quickly. The wiry vines can also become a tripping hazard when it's planted in between flagstones. The fast-spreading underground root system can be an advantage, however, when looking to keep weeds under control. The bright leaves are evergreen when the temperatures are mild enough, Its flowers emerge in late spring, but they're small, green and inconspicuous. Little white edible and juicy berries also develop as the seasons move on.
Botanical Name Muehlenbeckia axillaris Common Name Creeping Wire Vine, Sprawling Wirevine, Matted Lignum Plant Type Prostrate evergreen shrub Mature Size Up to 6 inches Sun Exposure Full Sun/ Partial Shade Soil Type Tolerates a variety, but must be well-drained Soil pH Not particular Bloom Time Late spring Flower Color White Hardiness Zones 5 to 9 Native Area New Zealand and Australia How to Grow Creeping Wire Vine Providing you select the right sunny or partial shade location, once Creeping Wire Vine is established, it requires very little maintenance. It does well in a variety of soils and even thrives in dry, rocky conditions. Once mature, your plant can cope with little irrigation. Light A sunny or partial shade location is what Creeping Wire Vine prefers. It can cope in areas with no shade, but just expect much slower growth. Soil Creeping Wire Vine isn't fussy when it comes to soil types. It copes well with dry, infertile soils and this is part of its appeal for use on rocky slopes where other plants struggle to thrive. It can help to minimize erosion in these types of areas. It doesn't cope with standing water, and the main requirement is that the soil is well-drained. Water During the first growing season, Creeping Wire Vie should be kept consistently moist. This will give the roots the best chance to establish. Once the plant is fully mature, although it prefers moist soil, it can cope with dry conditions.
Temperature and Humidity This hardy plant can handle alpine conditions, but you should expect a much slower growth rate. As you would expect of a plant that is native to Australia and New Zealand, Creeping Wire Vine thrives in warm conditions. Fertilizer In good quality soil, fertilizer will not be required. If your Creeping Wire Vine is in dry, rocky soil, it may benefit from an annual feeding in the spring, just before new growth starts. Propagating Creeping Wire Vine Although Matted Lignum can be grown from seed, propagating from a cutting is an easier way to establish new growth. It doesn't require a lot of rooting hormone and new roots form with little effort. Make sure that you take a cutting from a well-established stem. Young shrubs have a flexible stem that will struggle to reroot. Pruning Pruning isn't a necessity, but mowing down the shrub, particularly in the spring, can help to encourage new and healthy growth. It can also help to contain the spread if your plant is thriving in a sunny, warm position. You can mow it back at any time of the year if you feel it's getting too full. Being Grown in Containers Creeping Wire Vine looks great when planted at the edges of a container, allowing it to spill over the sides. It works well when it's selected alongside plants of contrasting heights and colors. Just be aware that the sprawling root system can overtake less robust plants sitting alongside it, and it'll probably require more frequent watering when sitting in a container. Growing From Seeds Propagating from a cutting is usually recommended because Creeping Wire Vine isn't self-fertile. The flowers on each plant are only one sex. This means you need male and female plants to ensure successful seeding. When planting Creeping Wire Vine, make sure you leave around half a meter of space between each plant. It spreads quickly and positioning them too close together can create overcrowding that can stunt growth.
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Miss Chen
06月27日
Miss Chen
Despite its common name, creeping zinnia (Sanvitalia procumbens) belongs to a different plant genus than the true zinnias (Zinnia spp.). It gets its name because the oval, pointed leaves bear a strong resemblance to those of the zinnias. And it is like zinnia in another way: It has a very long bloom period with colorful flowers that have the same daisy-like shape common to all members of the Asteraceae family. Creeping zinnia is a cheery annual plant with a spreading nature and low, 6-inch stature, ideal as groundcover or for planting in containers as trailers. The fine green foliage is unique in itself, but the small yellow blooms steal the show and have been compared in appearance to sunflowers, albeit a miniature version. Creeping zinnia is a true annual that dies at the end of the growing season, but its abundant blooms and carefree nature make it worth re-planting year after year. Creeping zinnia is normally planted from potted nursery starts in the spring after the threat of frost has passed, though it is also easy to grow from seed. Like most true annuals, it is a fast-growing plant that will flower in its first season—about 10 weeks after seeds are planted.
Common Name Creeping zinnia, Mexican creeping zinnia Botanical Name Sanvitalia procumbens Family Asteraceae Plant Type Herbaceous annual Mature Size 4–6 in. tall, 12–18 in. wide Sun Exposure Full to part sun Soil Type Well-drained Soil pH Acidic to slightly alkaline (5.5–7.5) Bloom Time Summer Flower Color Yellow, orange Hardiness Zones 2–11 (true annual, grown in all USDA zones) Native Area Central America (Mexico, Guatemala) Creeping Zinnia Care Creeping zinnia is an exceedingly easy plant to grow in a full-sun or partial shade location in moderately fertile soil, provided it gets sufficient water. It thrives in summer conditions and won't shrivel up even in the face of high temperatures and humidity. Creeping zinnia requires regular watering but does not tolerate soggy conditions. Creeping zinnia is often planted in spring from potted nursery plants after the soil has fully warmed in the spring and nighttime temperatures are reliably above 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Loosen the soil thoroughly, adding organic amendments such as peat moss or compost, if necessary. Plant so the top of the root ball is at the soil level. Many people, however, prefer to direct sow seeds in the precise locations where they want plants to grow, since creeping zinnias may react badly to transplanting. Direct-sown seeds are usually planted as soon as the ground can be worked in the spring. Sunlight Creeping zinnia will grow well in full sun or partial shade conditions, but its true flowering potential depends on direct sun for six to eight hours per day. In spots that receive just four to six hours of sun, these plants will generally fare fine but won’t have the same abundant blooms Soil These plants can tolerate a range of soil types, including average to relatively fertile, humus-rich conditions. However, creeping zinnia requires that soil drains well. Otherwise, its roots can become waterlogged and rot. Water While creeping zinnia enjoys hot weather and tolerates periods of drought, don’t let this fool you into thinking that this plant won’t need regular watering. It’s important to keep the plant from becoming waterlogged, but it prefers consistently medium-moist soil conditions. For this reason, you might need to water these plants once or twice daily if grown in a container during stretches of dry weather. Aim for moist but well-aerated soil that dries out slightly between waterings, but don't allow the soil to become overly dry and crumbly. Temperature and Humidity Hot temperatures and high humidity will make creeping zinnia feel right at home. Native to Central American countries Mexico and Guatemala, these plants thrive when the temperature rises and won’t wilt in a hot climate. But they’re only moderately tolerant of cool weather and will fade and die once the average nightly temperature dips below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Fertilizer For a healthy, abundantly-blooming plant, provide at least moderately fertile soil conditions. Creeping zinnia doesn’t have overly specific or substantial nutritional needs, but if the soil you plant it in is less than average, you might need to use organic or a balanced conventional fertilizer. Creeping zinnia planted in containers or pots often benefits from a slow-release fertilizer or a periodic application of liquid fertilizer to support the overall growth and health of the plant. Types of Creeping Zinnia There are more than a dozen named cultivars of creeping zinnia, mostly bred to exhibit small variations in flower shape and color or differences in foliage. Consider these recommendations: ‘Sprite’ series features semi-double flowers in shades of orange and yellow with dark brown centers. Plants are 10 to 12 inches tall. ‘Gold Braid’ is a profuse bloomer with golden-yellow flowers with dark brown centers. ‘Irish Eyes’ has orange-yellow flowers with green centers. Plants are a compact 6 inches in height. ‘Mandarin Orange’ features double flowers that are a deep, rich orange with dark brown center disks, closely resembling miniature sunflowers. Pruning Deadhead the spent flowers regularly to keep the plants looking neat and to promote continued blooming. Stems that become too long can be clipped back to keep the plants nicely compact. Propagating Creeping Zinnia Creeping zinnia can be propagated in several ways: from seeds collected from the flower heads; by dividing the rootball into separate sections for replanting; or by taking stem clipping to root in a growing medium. In commercial settings, it is normally propagated by seed, since the plant is not fond of being transplanted. But home gardeners often use the stem-cutting method to propagate new plants indoors over the winter, thereby keeping favorite plants alive. Here's how to do it: As the weather begins to cool in fall, use sharp pruners to clip 6- to 8-inch stem cuttings from healthy, actively growing plants. Remove any flowers and flower buds, and also remove the leaves from the bottom 2 inches of each cutting. Dip the cut end in rooting hormone, then plant the cutting in a 4-inch pot filled with a seed-starter mix or standard potting soil. Place the pot inside a loosely secured clear plastic bag, and set it in a location with bright, indirect light. Inspect the pot every few days and water lightly if the potting medium begins to dry out. Check for root development every week or so by tugging gently on the stem. When you begin to feel resistance, it means the cutting has developed roots. When an ample network of roots has developed, remove the pot from the plastic covering and continue to grow it in a warm, sunny location. The plant can continue to grow indoors until spring. Plant it outdoors once nighttime temperatures are reliably above 50 degrees Fahrenheit. . How to Grow Creeping Zinnia From Seed Starting creeping zinnia from seed isn't very complicated, but be aware these plants don't always tolerate being transplanted. For best results, consider direct-sowing seeds in the location where you want to grow them rather than in starter trays. The seeds are relatively easy to collect from individual spent blooms, though the small size of the flower heads might make it somewhat tedious work. They store well over the winter and can be planted in the spring. These seeds require sunlight to germinate, so don't bury them under a layer of soil. Instead, lightly press them into the soil surface or loosely cover them with peat moss. Water them daily and keep the soil moist for the seeds to germinate. It's always best to read the recommendations on the seed packet for specific sowing and care instructions. Plants will bloom about 10 weeks after the seeds are sown. Many gardeners seeking the earliest possible garden bloom like to start them indoors about two to three weeks before the expected last frost date. Potting and Repotting Creeping Zinnia The low growing habit and abundant blooms of creeping zinnia make it a great option for container culture. These plants will fill the container, window box, or another planter with small, beautiful blooms all summer long. Keep in mind that to grow these plants successfully in containers, you'll need to ensure that they have adequate drainage. Use a quality loose and lightweight potting mix to ensure the roots don't become saturated with too much water. Container-grown plants typically need more feeding than garden plants, mostly because the frequent watering quickly leaches nutrients from the potting medium. You might find it necessary to provide supplemental fertilizer for creeping zinnias grown in containers. Time-released or granular fertilizer pellets or a balanced liquid formula will generally give these plants a needed boost if they are not blooming as heavily as you want. Overwintering These frost-tender plants are normally just pulled up and discarded at the end of the growing season. If left in place, though, birds will arrive to pluck at the dried flowers for their edible seeds. Common Pests & Plant Diseases These sturdy little plants have no notable pests and diseases to worry about. But like almost any garden plant, creeping zinnia may occasionally be troubled by minor fungal leaf spots or powdery mildew. You can minimize these problems with careful watering by ground-level soaking rather than overhead spraying.
How to Get Creeping Zinnia to Bloom The general prescription for good blooms with creeping zinnia is to make sure they have plenty of water and sun—that's usually all it takes. In most situations, these plants will bloom vigorously all summer long—right up until cool fall weather sets in. In addition: Regular deadheading of spent flowers will prompt continued blooms. Long, leggy stems can be cut back to force denser growth and more flowers. Container-grown creeping zinnias may benefit from extra feeding. However, with garden plants already growing in suitably fertile soil, too much fertilizer tends to make for long leggy stems that don't produce as many flowers. Common Problems With Creeping Zinnia Although they are largely trouble-free, creeping zinnias may cause gardeners concern about these symptoms: Seedlings Die Immediately After Planting Even with potted nursery starts, transplanting creeping zinnias should be done very carefully so as to avoid disturbance of the roots. These plants often resent being moved, so treat them with kid gloves to make sure they survive transplanting into the garden. Some gardeners prefer to direct-sow the seeds in the exact locations where they want the plants to grow to avoid this problem. Plants Have Become Sparse When growing in fertile soil or when given a lot of fertilizer, creeping zinnias can develop long, leggy stems that are somewhat bare except at the tips. These leggy stems can be aggressively cut back to near the base of the plant, which will stimulate new growth and cause the plant to become fuller and bushier. FAQ How should I use creeping zinnia in the landscape? Creeping zinnias are often used as foreground bedding or edging plants in sunny border gardens, or in sunny rock gardens. Planted over large open sunny areas, they can make a colorful seasonal ground cover. They are also a very dependable plant for window boxes, hanging baskets, and large mixed patio/deck container gardens. Do creeping zinnias self-seed in the garden? Yes, if the flower heads are left on the plant, the tiny seeds often fall into the soil and take root. But these volunteers are not easy to dig up and move, so it's best to leave them in place to colonize. A small patch of creeping zinnias can be self-sustaining from year to year if you live some flower heads in place to drop seed and produce volunteers the following spring. Are there any standard zinnias that have this creeping, trailing habit? Most standard zinnias are upright plants, though some are quite short. But for a trailing habit similar to that of the creeping zinnia, try one of the cultivars of Zinnia augustifolea (spreading zinnia). They will have a similar growth habit to creeping zinnia, but they offer a considerably wider range of flower colors.
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Miss Chen
06月26日
Miss Chen
水培,可修剪一段花茎,摘掉下部分的叶片,修剪后放入瓶中,枝条能从水中吸取养分生长;雾培,营养液会通过雾气喷洒到植物根系上,补充生长所需的养分;基质栽培,基质栽培,用滴灌或细流灌溉的方法,给予植物营养液,维持植株的正常生长。
1、水培 水培指的是植物根系与营养液直接接触,不用基质栽培的方法。可修剪一段生长粗壮的花枝,修剪掉下方的叶片,从枝条底部45°角斜剪一刀,增加枝条的吸水面积,一般10~15天后,枝条便可生根。
2、雾培 雾培有被称为气培,无需通过固体基质,可直接将营养液通过雾气喷洒到植物的根系上,给予植物生长所需的营养和氧气。一般可使用泡沫板作为容器,打出小孔后,将植物栽入,将茎叶露在外表,根系悬挂在下方空间的阴暗处。适合在植被条件差的地方进行应用。
3、基质栽培 基质栽培是无土栽培中推广面积最大的一种方式,是将作物根系固定在有机物或无机物的基质中,通过无土栽培,采用滴灌或细流灌溉的方法,给予作物营养液。栽培基质可直接装入塑料袋中,铺设到栽培沟或槽内部。
4、深液流栽培 可将植物放入较深的营养液层中,根系伸展在营养液层中,每株占有的营养液含量较多,因而营养液浓度、溶解氧、酸碱度以及温度和水分存储量都不宜发生极剧的变动,为根系提供了一个较为稳定的生长环境。
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Miss Chen
06月26日
Miss Chen
观察表面,给盆土浇水前,可先观察土壤表面,若土壤表面颜色呈灰白色,需立即浇水保湿;插入手指,需往土壤中掺入手指,若感觉插入感觉坚硬费劲,需及时浇水;敲击花盆,可轻轻敲击花盆中间,若发出清脆悦耳的声响,需及时浇水,浸湿全部的土壤。
1、观察土面 日常养护花卉植物的过程中,可通过眼睛来观察土壤表面的颜色,判断植株是否应该浇水。若土壤表面颜色呈灰白色,则说明土壤处于干燥的状态,需立即浇水保湿。若土壤颜色呈褐色,则表明土壤处于湿润的状态,无需浇水。 2、插入手指 判断花卉植株是否需浇水还可用在土壤中插入手指,根据手指的触感来判断是否该浇水。将手指插入土壤2公分左右的深度,若感觉插入的较为坚硬且费劲,说明土壤缺水,需立即浇水保湿。若盆土能轻松插入手指,说明无需浇水。
3、敲击花盆 日常养护花卉植物的过程中,若无法判断是否该为盆土补水,可用手轻轻敲击花盆中间的位置,若发出清脆悦耳的声响,说明盆土较为干燥,需立即浇水保湿。若发出的声音较为沉闷,则无需浇水。 4、插入筷子 日常养护花卉植物的过程中,可在花盆边缘插入一根筷子,长度需略大于花盆的高度,将筷子全部插入花盆中,定期抽出进行观察,若筷子完全干透,需立即浇水保湿,若筷子一半干燥一半湿润,无需浇水。
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